Automatic Filters

Filox Filters

  • Why are these systems called "Filox" filters.

  • Filox is a trademark name of the Watts Waters Corp. These iron filters use a type of granular filter media called "Birm". It is manufactured from a type of natural pumice mineral coated with manganese oxide.

  • Do these systems come in different sizes?

  • Yes. The size of the filter system is directly proportional to the flow rate of the water, in gallons per minute. The higher the flow rate, the larger the system required.

  • How do they work?

  • As the water flows through the filter tank containing Filox media, a reaction occurs where the dissolved oxygen and the dissolved ferrous iron compounds form an insoluble ferric hydroxide. s water containing iron flows through the media, if there is enough oxygen in the water, the Filox causes the iron to form rust, or solid iron particles. After these rust particles get trapped in the filter media, once or twice a week they are automatically backwashed out to drain, and the filter media is ready to filter again.

  • Do these filters have any special conditions to work properly?

  • Yes! The water must have a pH of 5.0 to 10.0. In addition, the dissolved oxygen content must be at least 15% of the iron or manganese content. For some wells deeper than 50 feet, an air injector can be used to introduce some additional oxygen in the water prior to the Filox filter. If the water being filtered is water from an open storage tank or spring, no additional air injection is usually required.

  • If I chlorinate first, or use a chlorine bleach feeder for my well water, can I use this type of iron filter?

  • No. These iron filters should not be used if the water has a chlorine residual. De-chlorinate before the iron filter using a carbon filter, or better yet, use the greensand type of iron filter.

  • My water has a very bad smell of sulfur, is this a problem?

  • Yes. Do not use these iron filters when hydrogen sulfide (a natural toxic gas formed by iron and sulfur bacteria) is present. Depending on the levels of hydrogen sulfide gas, , it is better to use chlorination or ozone, followed by greensand or greensand blend iron filters if hydrogen sulfide and/or iron bacteria is present.

  • How much iron will these Filox filters remove?

  • Generally up to 10 ppm.

  • Are these systems big electrical power users?

  • No. The control valve uses only about 15 watts of energy to run the timer and backwash valve.

  • I have very high manganese (greater than .05 PPM), will these iron filters remove manganese also?

  • Yes, we do recommend Filox filters where manganese is present. For manganese removal to be effective, the pH must be neutral. It would be better to use a greensand filter to reduce manganese.

  • Is there a pressure loss through the system?

  • When properly sized, the system produces a very low pressure drop at service flow rates, usually around 5 psi.

  • What maintenance is required?

  • Under the right conditions there is little maintenance. This is the great advantage of the Filox filters. The systems uses no salt or chemicals and there are no filter cartridges to replace.

  • Can I route the backwash water to my septic tank?

  • Yes. The backwash water is non toxic and can be routed to the septic tank with no problem. It can also be routed to landscaping, although the backwash is usually very dark and orange, and will stain surfaces.

  • How frequently do I have to replace the filter media?

  • The filter media will last for 5 to 10 years depending on usage and conditions. It is easily replaced.

IRON FILTERS

ORANGE STAINING in your washer? Rusty stains in your toilet? These could be a sign of iron in your water. The good news is, low concentrations can be removed by a water softener. Higher concentrations would require the use of an iron filter, such as a Greensand Filter.

Source of Iron in Water: Iron is a naturally occurring element and makes up almost 5% of the earth's core. It is no wonder that it so often occurs in surface water and well water.

Symptoms of Iron in Water: Even though iron may not have any health affects, in water it can be very corrosive, causing damaged pipes and appliances. This can also cause pipes to leak, creating even more contaminants in the water. There are four types of iron that may contaminate natural groundwater sources. Each type of iron in drinking water can exist alone or in combination with the others.

Ferrous iron (also known as clear water iron) is ferrous bicarbonate. The water is clear and iron is in a dissolved state. To filter this type of iron, it must first oxidize, converting it to ferric iron.

Ferric iron, or ferric hydroxide, is visible in the water, giving the water a reddish tinge, which is why it is known as "red water iron." This is the kind of iron that can cause staining in sinks, washing machines, toilets and other places where the water comes in contact.

Organic iron (iron bacteria) is a group of bacteria that only need low levels of iron to create the organic molecules needed for their existence. Iron bacteria creates a gelatinous sludge on top of water. It will also create bad smelling drinking water. While looking at the top of a container of water, if the surface reflects a rainbow slick, it is likely contaminated with organic iron.

Collodial iron (known as dispersed iron) stays suspended in the water giving a red-pink look to the water.

Filtration Solutions for Iron: There is a variety of water filters for iron. Ferrous iron (clear water iron) can be removed and filtered with a water softener provided it is less than 0.5 ppm for each grain of hardness and the pH of the water is greater than 6.8. If the ferrous iron is more than 5.0 ppm, the iron water treatment solution must convert it to ferric iron by contact with an oxidizing agent such as chlorine, before it can be removed from drinking water by mechanical filtration. Ferric iron can be removed by mechanical filtration and iron water filters. Organic iron can be removed by an anion resin or by oxidation with chlorine followed by mechanical filtration. Oxidizing agents such as chlorine will also kill iron bacteria in water if it is present. Use an iron water test to determine the levels of iron in your water.

Filtration Solutions for Iron: There is a variety of water filters for iron. Ferrous iron (clear water iron) can be removed and filtered with a water softener provided it is less than 0.5 ppm for each grain of hardness and the pH of the water is greater than 6.8. If the ferrous iron is more than 5.0 ppm, the iron water treatment solution must convert it to ferric iron by contact with an oxidizing agent such as chlorine, before it can be removed from drinking water by mechanical filtration. Ferric iron can be removed by mechanical filtration and iron water filters. Organic iron can be removed by an anion resin or by oxidation with chlorine followed by mechanical filtration. Oxidizing agents such as chlorine will also kill iron bacteria in water if it is present. Use an iron water test to determine the levels of iron in your water.

Neutralizers

Installing an acid neutralizer is the most effective and economical way to correct a low pH imbalance of your water. The telltale signs of acidic water - having copper pipes with blue or green stains in the bottom of your tub or sinks. If you have low pH, acidic water not only can create these stains, but can also, over time, damage your copper water pipes and create pin-hole leaks. By installing an acid neutralizer you can slow down or stop the problem at its source.
Essentially, this can save you a lot of money in the long run by not damaging your expensive fixtures and copper water pipes.

 

HOW IT WORKS:

The mineral, calcite (calcium carbonate) or a mixture of calcite and magnesium oxide, is installed into the mineral tank. As acidic (low pH) water flows into the tank head it is directed down through the media to the bottom of the tank forcing the water to flow "up" through the distributor tube in the tank. The minerals dissolve into the water causing a boost in the pH level by effectively increasing the hydrogen ion concentration in the water.

Ideally you want to raise the pH to approximately 7 units. This unit measurement is based on the pH scale ranging from 0 to 14. Each one unit change in the pH scale corresponds to a ten-fold change in the hydrogen ion concentration. In pure water the unit 7 on the pH scale denotes the pH level as neutral. Any pH values lower than 7 are considered acidic and any pH values higher than 7 are alkaline. Generally, APH range from 6.5 – 8.5 is an acceptable value. Acidic water will be detrimental to copper piping.